Physicians' psychophysiological stress reaction in medical communication of bad news: A critical literature review.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 2017_Studer_Physicians_IntJPsychophysiol_post-print.pdf (745.39 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_04B7306127B8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Physicians' psychophysiological stress reaction in medical communication of bad news: A critical literature review.
Périodique
International Journal of Psychophysiology
Auteur(s)
Studer Regina K., Danuser Brigitta, Gomez Patrick
ISSN
1872-7697 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0167-8760
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
10/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
120
Pages
14-22
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Stress is a common phenomenon in medical professions. Breaking bad news (BBN) is reported to be a particularly distressing activity for physicians. Traditionally, the stress experienced by physicians when BBN was assessed exclusively using self-reporting. Only recently, the field of difficult physician-patient communication has used physiological assessments to better understand physicians' stress reactions.
This paper's goals are to (a) review current knowledge about the physicians' psychophysiological stress reactions in BBN situations, (b) discuss methodological aspects of these studies and (c) suggest directions for future research.
The seven studies identified all used scenarios with simulated patients but were heterogeneous with regard to other methodological aspects, such as the psychophysiological parameters, time points and durations assessed, comparative settings, and operationalisation of the communication scenarios. Despite this heterogeneity, all the papers reported increases in psychological and/or physiological activation when breaking bad news in comparison to control conditions, such as history taking or breaking good news.
Taken together, the studies reviewed support the hypothesis that BBN is a psychophysiologically arousing and stressful task for medical professionals. However, much remains to be done. We suggest several future directions to advance the field. These include (a) expanding and refining the conceptual framework, (b) extending assessments to include more diverse physiological parameters, (c) exploring the modulatory effects of physicians' personal characteristics (e.g. level of experience), (d) comparing simulated and real-life physician-patient encounters and (e) combining physiological assessment with a discourse analysis of physician-patient communication.
Mots-clé
Communication, Humans, Physician-Patient Relations, Physicians/psychology, Stress, Psychological/physiopathology, Breaking bad news, Medical students, Physicians, Physician–patient communication, Psychophysiology, Stress reaction
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
12/04/2017 19:40
Dernière modification de la notice
18/02/2019 18:06
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