High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging Can Reliably Detect Orbital Tumor Recurrence after Enucleation in Children with Retinoblastoma.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_FEC7ECACCE37
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging Can Reliably Detect Orbital Tumor Recurrence after Enucleation in Children with Retinoblastoma.
Périodique
Ophthalmology
Auteur(s)
Sirin S., de Jong M.C., de Graaf P., Brisse H.J., Galluzzi P., Maeder P., Bornfeld N., Biewald E., Metz K.A., Temming P., Castelijns J.A., Goericke S.L.
Collaborateur(s)
European Retinoblastoma Imaging Collaboration
Contributeur(s)
Castelijns JA., de Graaf P., de Jong MC. , Brisse HJ., Galluzzi P., Göricke SL., Sirin S., Maeder P.
ISSN
1549-4713 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0161-6420
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
123
Numéro
3
Pages
635-645
Langue
anglais
Résumé
PURPOSE: Orbital tumor recurrence is a rare but serious complication in children with retinoblastoma, leading to a high risk of metastasis and death. Therefore, we assume that these recurrences have to be detected and treated as early as possible. Preliminary studies used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate postsurgical findings in the orbit. In this study, we assessed the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution MRI to detect orbital tumor recurrence in children with retinoblastoma in a large study cohort.
DESIGN: Consecutive retrospective study (2007-2013) assessing MRI findings after enucleation.
PARTICIPANTS: A total of 103 MRI examinations of 55 orbits (50 children, 27 male/23 female, mean age 16.3±12.4 months) with a median time of 8 months (range, 0-93) after enucleation for retinoblastoma.
METHODS: High-resolution MRI using orbital surface coils was performed on 1.5 Tesla MRI systems to assess abnormal orbital findings.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Five European experts in retinoblastoma imaging evaluated the MRI examinations regarding the presence of abnormal orbital gadolinium enhancement and judged them as "definitive tumor," "suspicious of tumor," "postsurgical condition/scar formation," or "without pathologic findings." The findings were correlated to histopathology (if available), MRI, and clinical follow-up.
RESULTS: Abnormal orbital enhancement was a common finding after enucleation (100% in the first 3 months after enucleation, 64.3% >3 years after enucleation). All histopathologically confirmed tumor recurrences (3 of 55 orbits, 5.5%) were correctly judged as "definitive tumor" in MRI. Two orbits from 2 children rated as "suspicious of tumor" received intravenous chemotherapy without histopathologic confirmation; further follow-up (67 and 47 months) revealed no sign of tumor recurrence. In 90.2%, no tumor was suspected on MRI, which was clinically confirmed during follow-up (median follow-up after enucleation, 45 months; range, 8-126).
CONCLUSIONS: High-resolution MRI with orbital surface coils may reliably distinguish between common postsurgical contrast enhancement and orbital tumor recurrence, and therefore may be a useful tool to evaluate orbital tumor recurrence after enucleation in children with retinoblastoma. We recommend high-resolution MRI as a potential screening tool for the orbit in children with retinoblastoma to exclude tumor recurrence, especially in high-risk patients within the critical first 2 years after enucleation.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
22/03/2016 16:23
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 17:29
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