Acetylation (O-factor 5) affects the structural and immunological properties of Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide O antigen

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_FE97ADDFD655
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Acetylation (O-factor 5) affects the structural and immunological properties of Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide O antigen
Périodique
Infection and Immunity
Auteur(s)
Slauch  J. M., Mahan  M. J., Michetti  P., Neutra  M. R., Mekalanos  J. J.
ISSN
0019-9567 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/1995
Volume
63
Numéro
2
Pages
437-41
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. --- Old month value: Feb
Résumé
The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of gram-negative bacteria serves as a barrier between the cell and its environment. The LPS O antigen is the immunodominant portion of the molecule and thus has a significant effect on the interaction between a bacterial pathogen and the host organism. Antibodies directed against O antigen are vital to the immune response to infection. In this study, we have characterized the interaction between a series of monoclonal immunoglobulin A antibodies and the LPS of Salmonella typhimurium. Using one of these antibodies, we have previously shown that monoclonal immunoglobulin A is sufficient to protect against S. typhimurium infection, both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we show that recognition of LPS by the monoclonal antibodies is affected by acetylation of the O antigen on the abequose moiety, the determinant of the O5 epitope. Although recognition of LPS by several of the monoclonal antibodies is completely dependent on acetylation, the antibodies recognize clearly separable epitopes. This suggests that acetylation of O antigen affects the three-dimensional structure of the molecule and thus creates and destroys a series of conformational antigenic determinants. We have shown that a change in the acetylation state of LPS has no effect on virulence. However, acetylation has important consequences for the mucosal immune response and thus could potentially have profound implications for the ability of an immune host to respond to a subsequent infection.
Mots-clé
Acetylation Antibodies, Bacterial/*immunology Antibodies, Monoclonal/*immunology Chromosome Mapping Genes, Bacterial O Antigens Polysaccharides, Bacterial/*chemistry Salmonella typhimurium/genetics/*immunology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 16:02
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:29
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