Does the working environment influence health care professionals' values, meaning in life and religiousness? Palliative care units compared with maternity wards.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_FD8421C52C8C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Does the working environment influence health care professionals' values, meaning in life and religiousness? Palliative care units compared with maternity wards.
Périodique
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Auteur(s)
Fegg M., L'hoste S., Brandstätter M., Borasio G.D.
ISSN
1873-6513 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0885-3924
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
48
Numéro
5
Pages
915-923
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
CONTEXT: Increased altruism, self-transcendence, and quests for meaning in life (MiL) have been found in palliative care (PC) patients and their families who experience the finiteness of life. Similar changes were observed in healthy subjects who were experimentally confronted with their mortality.
OBJECTIVES: The study investigated how daily experiences of the transitoriness of life influence PC health care professionals' (HCPs) values, MiL, and religiousness.
METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, the Schwartz Value Survey, the Schedule for Meaning in Life Evaluation, and the Idler Index of Religiosity were used to investigate personal values, MiL, and private religiousness. HCPs working in PC (confronted with death) were compared with a control group of HCPs working at maternity wards (MWs) using multivariate models. Differences were considered to be statistically significant at P < 0.05.
RESULTS: Seventy PC- and 70 MW-HCPs took part in the study (response rate 74.0%). No differences between the groups were found in overall MiL satisfaction scores. PC-HCPs were significantly more religious than MW-HCPs; they listed spirituality and nature experience more often as areas in which they experience MiL. Furthermore, hedonism was more important for PC-HCPs, and they had higher scores in openness-to-change values (stimulation and self-direction). MW-HCPs were more likely to list family as a MiL area. They assigned more importance to health and scored higher in conservation values (conformity and security). Duration of professional experience did not influence these results.
CONCLUSION: Basic differences in values, MiL, and religiousness between PC-HCPs and MW-HCPs might have influenced the choice of working environment because no effect of job duration was observed. Longitudinal research is needed to confirm this hypothesis.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
27/12/2014 9:32
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:28
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