Trophic resource partitioning and competition between the two sibling bat species Myotis myotis and Myotis blythii

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_FBE22CC92312
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Trophic resource partitioning and competition between the two sibling bat species Myotis myotis and Myotis blythii
Périodique
Journal of Animal Ecology
Auteur(s)
Arlettaz R., Perrin N., Hausser J.
ISSN
0021-8790
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
11/1997
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
66
Numéro
6
Pages
897-911
Langue
anglais
Notes
http://www.jstor.org/stable/6005
Résumé
1. Niche theory predicts that the stable coexistence of species within a guild should be associated, if resources are limited, with a mechanism of resource partitioning. Using extensive data on diets, the present study attempts: (i) to test the hypothesis that, in sympatry, the interspecific overlap between the trophic niches of the sibling bat species Myotis myotis and M. blythii-which coexist intimately in their roosts-is effectively lower than the two intraspecific overlaps; (ii) to assess the role played by interspecific competition in resource partitioning through the study of trophic niche displacement between several sympatric and allopatric populations.
2. Diets were determined by the analysis of faecal samples collected in the field from individual bats captured in various geographical areas. Trophic niche overlaps were calculated monthly for all possible intraspecific and interspecific pairs of individuals from sympatric populations. Niche breadth was estimated from: (i) every faecal sample; (ii) all the faecal samples collected per month in a given population (geographical area).
3. In every population, the bulk of the diets of M. myotis and M. blythii consisted of, respectively, terrestrial (e.g. carabid beetles) and grass-dwelling (mostly bush crickets) prey. All intraspecific trophic niche overlaps were significantly greater than the interspecific one, except in Switzerland in May when both species exploited mass concentrations of cockchafers, a non-limiting food source. This clearcut partitioning of resources may allow the stable, intimate coexistence observed under sympatric conditions.
4. Relative proportions of ground-and grass-dwelling prey, as well as niche breadths (either individual or population), did not differ significantly between sympatry and allopatry, showing that, under allopatric conditions, niche expansion does not take place. This suggests that active interspecific competition is not the underlying mechanism responsible for the niche partitioning which is currently observed between M. myotis and M. blythii.
Mots-clé
Chiroptera, community ecology, cryptic species, dietary niches, niche displacement
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 19:02
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:27
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