Evolution of Gait Performance and Fear of Falling after a 10-Week Program of Exercise Training in Community Dwelling Older People

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_F3D1A1B15275
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Abstract (résumé de présentation): article court qui reprend les éléments essentiels présentés à l'occasion d'une conférence scientifique dans un poster ou lors d'une intervention orale.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Evolution of Gait Performance and Fear of Falling after a 10-Week Program of Exercise Training in Community Dwelling Older People
Titre de la conférence
Gerontological Society of America (GSA) 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Bula C.J., Martin E., Aminian K., Najafi B., Piot-Ziegler C., Rochat S.
Adresse
Atlanta, Georgia, November 18-22, 2009
ISBN
0016-9013
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
49
Série
Gerontologist
Pages
240
Langue
anglais
Notes
Meeting Abstract
Résumé
A pilot study was conducted to determine the effect of a 10-week, low intensity, exercise training program on fear of falling and gait in fifty (mean age 78.1 years, 79% women) community-dwelling volunteers. Fear of falling (measured by falls self-efficacy) and gait performance were assessed at baseline and one week after program completion. At follow-up, participants modestly improved their falls self-efficacy and gait speed. To investigate whether this effect differed according to participants' fear of falling, secondary analyses stratified by subject's baseline falls efficacy were performed. Subjects with lower than average falls efficacy improved significantly their falls efficacy and gait performance, while no significant change occurred in the others. Small but significant improvements occurred after this pilot training program, particularly in subjects with low baseline falls efficacy. These results suggest that measures of falls efficacy might be useful for better targeting individuals most likely to benefit from similar training programs.
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/02/2010 10:51
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:20
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