'The Fall of the House of Usher' and the Architecture of Unreliability

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_F1AD2C80EA08
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
'The Fall of the House of Usher' and the Architecture of Unreliability
Titre du livre
The Oxford Handbook to Edgar Allan Poe
Auteur(s)
Soltysik Monnet Agnieszka
Editeur
Oxford University Press
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/07/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Editeur scientifique
Kennedy J. Gerald, Peeples Scott
Langue
anglais
Résumé
This chapter examines what many scholars consider the most accomplished and representative of Poe’s tales, “The Fall of the House of Usher.” Starting with a summary of the main axes of interpretation in the story’s reception history, I proceed to an analysis of the tale’s main narrative strategy – one that I argue is prototypical of Poe’s narrative technique in his short fiction in general – namely, the unreliable narrator. Linking this device to the unstable architectonics of the house in the story, the chapter argues that the unreliability of the narrator lies at the heart of the text’s ability to choreograph active reader participation and pleasure. The chapter will also historicize the specific kind of unreliable narrators that Poe favors – those lacking a moral conscience or ethically-informed perception – within the paradoxes of antebellum culture. In doing so, the essay intends to demonstrate how combining formal and historical considerations is the most effective way to apprehend both the affective and cultural dimensions of Poe’s work.
Mots-clé
Edgar Allan Poe, conscience, slavery, narrator, antebellum, unreliable narrator
Création de la notice
05/08/2018 16:18
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 5:18
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