Impact of COVID-19 on cancer service delivery: results from an international survey of oncology clinicians.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_EBC36A1764E1
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Impact of COVID-19 on cancer service delivery: results from an international survey of oncology clinicians.
Périodique
ESMO open
Auteur(s)
Chazan G., Franchini F., Alexander M., Banerjee S., Mileshkin L., Blinman P., Zielinski R., Karikios D., Pavlakis N., Peters S., Lordick F., Ball D., Wright G., IJzerman M., Solomon B.
ISSN
2059-7029 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2059-7029
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
5
Numéro
6
Pages
e001090
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Multicenter Study
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To report clinician-perceived changes to cancer service delivery in response to COVID-19.
Multidisciplinary Australasian cancer clinician survey in collaboration with the European Society of Medical Oncology.
Between May and June 2020 clinicians from 70 countries were surveyed; majority from Europe (n=196; 39%) with 1846 COVID-19 cases per million people, Australia (AUS)/New Zealand (NZ) (n=188; 38%) with 267/236 per million and Asia (n=75; 15%) with 121 per million at time of survey distribution.
Medical oncologists (n=372; 74%), radiation oncologists (n=91; 18%) and surgical oncologists (n=38; 8%).
Eighty-nine per cent of clinicians reported altering clinical practices; more commonly among those with versus without patients diagnosed with COVID-19 (n=142; 93% vs n=225; 86%, p=0.03) but regardless of community transmission levels (p=0.26). More European clinicians (n=111; 66.1%) had treated patients diagnosed with COVID-19 compared with Asia (n=20; 27.8%) and AUS/NZ (n=8; 4.8%), p<0.001. Many clinicians (n=307; 71.4%) reported concerns that reduced access to standard treatments during the pandemic would negatively impact patient survival. The reported proportion of consultations using telehealth increased by 7.7-fold, with 25.1% (n=108) of clinicians concerned that patient survival would be worse due to this increase. Clinicians reviewed a median of 10 fewer outpatients/week (including non-face to face) compared with prior to the pandemic, translating to 5010 fewer specialist oncology visits per week among the surveyed group. Mental health was negatively impacted for 52.6% (n=190) of clinicians.
Clinicians reported widespread changes to oncology services, in regions of both high and low COVID-19 case numbers. Clinician concerns of potential negative impacts on patient outcomes warrant objective assessment, with system and policy implications for healthcare delivery at large.
Mots-clé
Adult, Asia/epidemiology, Australia/epidemiology, COVID-19/epidemiology, COVID-19/virology, Europe/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Male, Medical Oncology/methods, Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data, Neoplasms/epidemiology, Neoplasms/therapy, Oncologists/statistics & numerical data, Pandemics, SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification, Surveys and Questionnaires, COVID-19, oncology, service delivery
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
07/12/2020 14:57
Dernière modification de la notice
30/04/2021 7:16
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