Neural Reorganization Due to Neonatal Amygdala Lesions in the Rhesus Monkey: Changes in Morphology and Network Structure.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_E804392DE668
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Neural Reorganization Due to Neonatal Amygdala Lesions in the Rhesus Monkey: Changes in Morphology and Network Structure.
Périodique
Cerebral cortex
Auteur(s)
Grayson D.S., Bliss-Moreau E., Bennett J., Lavenex P., Amaral D.G.
ISSN
1460-2199 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1047-3211
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/06/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Numéro
6
Pages
3240-3253
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
It is generally believed that neural damage that occurs early in development is associated with greater adaptive capacity relative to similar damage in an older individual. However, few studies have surveyed whole brain changes following early focal damage. In this report, we employed multimodal magnetic resonance imaging analyses of adult rhesus macaque monkeys who had previously undergone bilateral, neurotoxic lesions of the amygdala at about 2 weeks of age. A deformation-based morphometric approach demonstrated reduction of the volumes of the anterior temporal lobe, anterior commissure, basal ganglia, and pulvinar in animals with early amygdala lesions compared to controls. In contrast, animals with early amygdala lesions had an enlarged cingulate cortex, medial superior frontal gyrus, and medial parietal cortex. Diffusion-weighted imaging tractography and network analysis were also used to compare connectivity patterns and higher-level measures of communication across the brain. Using the communicability metric, which integrates direct and indirect paths between regions, lesioned animals showed extensive degradation of network integrity in the temporal and orbitofrontal cortices. This work demonstrates both degenerative as well as progressive large-scale neural changes following long-term recovery from neonatal focal brain damage.

Mots-clé
Amygdala/diagnostic imaging, Amygdala/pathology, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Brain Injuries/chemically induced, Brain Injuries/diagnostic imaging, Brain Injuries/pathology, Brain Injuries/physiopathology, Connectome, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists/toxicity, Female, Ibotenic Acid/toxicity, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Longitudinal Studies, Macaca mulatta, Male, Neural Pathways/physiology, brain damage, connectome, morphometry, plasticity, tractography
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/04/2017 11:21
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:10
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