Functional neuroimaging study of performances on a Go/No-go task in 6- to 7-year-old preterm children: Impact of intrauterine growth restriction ???

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_E74722845331
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Functional neuroimaging study of performances on a Go/No-go task in 6- to 7-year-old preterm children: Impact of intrauterine growth restriction ???
Périodique
Neuroimage : Clinical
Auteur(s)
Réveillon M., Urben S., Barisnikov K., Borradori Tolsa C., Hüppi P.S., Lazeyras F.
ISSN
2213-1582 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2213-1582
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
3
Pages
429-437
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Article ; research-article Identifiant PubMed Central: PMC3830070
Résumé
Children born preterm, and more specifically those with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), are prone to exhibit scholastic difficulties and behavioral problems later in development. Neuropsychological studies showed that their deficits in response inhibition and attention could be at the heart of these difficulties. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using a Go/No-go task in preterm adolescents and adults suggest their use of an alternative neuronal pathway to compensate for a possible delayed development. However, little is known about the impact of IUGR at a functional neural network level. This study used fMRI to explore brain regions activated during a Go/No-go task in 20 preterm children aged 6-7 years, 10 of which were born with IUGR. Results showed that preterm children without IUGR preferentially activated fronto-temporal regions including the inferior frontal cortex, region known to be involved in successful response inhibition. In contrast, IUGR preterm children exhibited greater activation in the putamen, in the medial frontal cortex and parietal regions, specifically involved in attention demanding tasks, some being part of the default-mode network. These findings suggest that IUGR preterm children use different brain regions and a more diffuse network to perform the task, which interfere with goal-directed activity and may reflect inefficient attentional control. The differences observed in IUGR preterm children might relate to their higher risk for neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders.
Mots-clé
IUGR, Prematurity, Response inhibition, Attention, fMRI, Children
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
11/07/2016 10:04
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:10
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