Blood oxidative stress markers in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and how it correlates with diet

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_E236F06DC6B9
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Blood oxidative stress markers in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and how it correlates with diet
Périodique
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Auteur(s)
Machado M.V., Ravasco P., Jesus L., Marques-Vidal P., Oliveira C.R., Proença T., Baldeiras I., Camilo M.E., Cortez-Pinto H.
ISSN
0036-5521 (Print)
ISSN-L
0036-5521
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Volume
43
Numéro
1
Pages
95-9102
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common condition that can progress to endstage liver disease. The steatotic liver seems to be particularly susceptible to oxidative stress damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the redox state in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and its correlation with dietary intake.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Plasma concentrations of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG), vitamins A and E, total antioxidant status (TAS), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and reductase (GSH-Red) erythrocyte activities were compared between 43 NASH patients and 33 healthy controls. 4-HNE, GSH-Px, GSH-Red and TAS were evaluated by spectrophotometry, 8-OHdG by ELISA assay, GSH and GSSG by fluorimetric assay and vitamins A and E by high performance liquid chromatography. Dietary habits were also evaluated in these patients.
RESULTS: GSH levels (21.1 +/- 18.3 versus 33.1 +/- 22.2 microM, p = 0.01) and GSH/GSSG ratio (0.9 +/- 0.7 versus 1.5 +/- 0.8, p = 0.01) were lower and TAS (832 +/- 146 versus 630 +/-140 microM, p < 0.001) and vitamin E (47.1 +/- 14.9 versus 34.5 +/- 7.3 microM, p < 0.001) were higher in NASH patients, although there was no difference in GSH-Px and GSH-Red activities, 8-OHdG and 4-HNE levels between groups. After adjusting for total energy consumption, a negative correlation was found with total and saturated fat intake and GSH/GSSG ratio, and a positive correlation with carbohydrates, fiber, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), specifically N-3 PUFA, and vitamins E, C, selenium and folate.
CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest an impaired glutathione metabolism towards an oxidant status in NASH patients, correlating with a higher intake of saturated fat and a lower intake of carbohydrates. Plasmatic concentrations of oxidative stress cellular markers did not translate to hepatic oxidative damage.
Mots-clé
Aldehydes/blood, Erythrocytes/enzymology, Fatty Liver/blood, Glutathione Peroxidase/blood, Glutathione Reductase/blood, Guanosine/analogs & derivatives, Guanosine/blood, Vitamin E/blood
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
01/12/2016 15:01
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:06
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