Reciprocal preening and food sharing in colour-polymorphic nestling barn owls.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_E1ABEF5576C9.P001.pdf (627.52 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_E1ABEF5576C9
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Reciprocal preening and food sharing in colour-polymorphic nestling barn owls.
Périodique
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Roulin A., Des Monstiers B., Ifrid E., Da Silva A., Genzoni E., Dreiss A.N.
ISSN
1420-9101 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1010-061X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Numéro
2
Pages
380-394
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Barn owl (Tyto alba) siblings preen and offer food items to one another, behaviours that can be considered prosocial because they benefit a conspecific by relieving distress or need. In experimental broods, we analysed whether such behaviours were reciprocated, preferentially exchanged between specific phenotypes, performed to avoid harassment and food theft or signals of hierarchy status. Three of the results are consistent with the hypothesis of direct reciprocity. First, food sharing was reciprocated in three-chick broods but not in pairs of siblings, that is when nestlings could choose a partner with whom to develop a reciprocating interaction. Second, a nestling was more likely to give a prey item to its sibling if the latter individual had preened the former. Third, siblings matched their investment in preening each other. Manipulation of age hierarchy showed that food stealing was directed towards older siblings but was not performed to compensate for a low level of cooperation received. Social behaviours were related to melanin-based coloration, suggesting that animals may signal their propensity to interact socially. The most prosocial phenotype (darker reddish) was also the phenotype that stole more food, and the effect of coloration on prosocial behaviour depended upon rank and sex, suggesting that colour-related prosociality is state dependent.
Mots-clé
allofeeding, allopreening, altruism, cooperation, food sharing, food stealing, reciprocity, sibling competition, social behaviour, Tyto alba
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/11/2015 14:33
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 17:05
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