Asexual multiplication of larval parasitic worms: a predictor of adult life-history traits in Taeniidae?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_DE924EA6E816
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Asexual multiplication of larval parasitic worms: a predictor of adult life-history traits in Taeniidae?
Périodique
Parasitology Research
Auteur(s)
Trouve  S., Morand  S., Gabrion  C.
ISSN
0932-0113 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2003
Volume
89
Numéro
2
Pages
81-8
Notes
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Jan
Résumé
The hypothesis that asexual multiplication inside the intermediate host and adult life-history traits within the final host are independent is tested among Cestoda. Using phylogenetic relationships among the Cestoda species, we can show that asexual multiplication appears to have been lost and recovered several times throughout Taeniidae evolution; this allows a comparison of the adult life-history traits of species with and without asexual multiplication at the larval stage. The adult trait considered is the size of the parasite, since numerous life-history traits, such as fecundity and longevity, are correlated with size. If adult traits are independent of whether the larval stage reproduced asexually or not, we expect no difference in the adult size of the proliferative (i.e. with asexual multiplication) and non-proliferative species. The results are inconsistent with this hypothesis. In contrast, species with asexual multiplication in the intermediate host seem to have smaller adult size, reflecting a trade-off. We propose that ecological factors involving intraspecific and interspecific competition in the final host might be responsible for this trade-off. The role of these parameters in the evolution of life-history traits and more precisely in the acquisition of asexual multiplication is investigated with comparative analysis and discussed in the context of host-parasite interactions.
Mots-clé
Animals Cestoda/classification/genetics/*growth & development Cestode Infections/epidemiology Evolution Host-Parasite Relations Larva/physiology Life Cycle Stages Phylogeny *Reproduction, Asexual
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 18:34
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 17:03
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