Relationships of cotinine and self-reported cigarette smoking with hemoglobin A1c in the U.S.: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2008.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_DC26B32CC08F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Relationships of cotinine and self-reported cigarette smoking with hemoglobin A1c in the U.S.: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2008.
Périodique
Diabetes Care
Auteur(s)
Clair C., Bitton A., Meigs J.B., Rigotti N.A.
ISSN
1935-5548 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0149-5992
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
34
Numéro
10
Pages
2250-2255
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: Whether nicotine leads to a persistent increase in blood glucose levels is not clear. Our objective was to assess the relationship between cotinine, a nicotine metabolite, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), an index of recent glycemia.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We used cross-sectional data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 to 2008. We limited our analysis to 17,287 adults without diabetes. We created three cotinine categories: <0.05 ng/mL, 0.05-2.99 ng/mL, and ≥3 ng/mL.
RESULTS: Using self-report, 25% of the sample were current smokers, 24% were former smokers, and 51% were nonsmokers. Smokers had a higher mean HbA(1c) (5.36% ± 0.01 SE) compared with never smokers (5.31% ± 0.01) and former smokers (5.31% ± 0.01). In a similar manner, mean HbA(1c) was higher among participants with cotinine ≥3 ng/mL (5.35% ± 0.01) and participants with cotinine 0.05-2.99 ng/mL (5.34% ± 0.01) compared with participants with cotinine <0.05 ng/mL (5.29% ± 0.01). In multivariable-adjusted analysis, we found that both a cotinine ≥3 ng/mL and self-reported smoking were associated with higher HbA(1c) compared with a cotinine <0.05 ng/mL or not smoking. People with a cotinine level ≥3 ng/mL had a relative 5% increase in HbA(1c) compared with people with a cotinine level <0.05 ng/mL, and smokers had a relative 7% increase in HbA(1c) compared with never smokers.
CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that cotinine is associated with increased HbA(1c) in a representative sample of the U.S. population without diabetes.
Mots-clé
Adult, Cotinine/administration & dosage, Cotinine/adverse effects, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated/metabolism, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nutrition Surveys, Self Report, Smoking/adverse effects, Smoking/blood, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/08/2014 8:42
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:01
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