Interference-based methods to mitigate gambling craving: a proof-of-principle pilot study

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Cornil_IGS_2021.pdf (1462.53 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_DBF4F0A5B4F0
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Interference-based methods to mitigate gambling craving: a proof-of-principle pilot study
Périodique
International Gambling Studies
Auteur(s)
Cornil Aurélien, Rothen Stéphane, De Timary Philippe, Billieux Joël
ISSN
1445-9795
1479-4276
Statut éditorial
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Pages
1-24
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Craving is central in the prognosis of gambling disorder. The elaborated intrusion theory (EIT) provides a sound framework to account for craving in addictive disorders, and interference methods inspired from the EIT have substantiated their effectiveness in mitigating substance and food-related cravings. The principle of these methods is to recruit the cognitive resources underlying craving (e.g., visuospatial skills, mental imagery) for another competitive and cognitively demanding task, thus reducing the vividness and overwhelming nature of craving. Here we conducted two experiments employing a between-subjects design to test the efficacy of interference methods for reducing laboratory-induced craving. In these experiments, gamblers (n = 38 for both experiments) first followed a craving induction procedure. They then performed either a visuospatial interference task (making a mental and vivid image of a bunch of keys [experiment 1] or playing the video game Tetris [experiment 2]; experimental conditions) or another task supposed not to recruit visuospatial skills and mental imagery (exploding bubble pack [experiment 1] or counting backwards [experiment 2]; control conditions). Results show that all methods successively mitigated induced craving. Although previous research evidenced the superiority of visuospatial tasks to reduce substance-related craving, our findings question their superiority in the context of gambling craving.
Mots-clé
Gambling, Craving, Interference, Elaborated Intrusion Theory, Gambling Disorder, Problem Gambling
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
31/03/2021 8:41
Dernière modification de la notice
01/04/2021 7:12
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