Understanding the role of the primary somatosensory cortex: Opportunities for rehabilitation.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_DBBF55914856
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Understanding the role of the primary somatosensory cortex: Opportunities for rehabilitation.
Périodique
Neuropsychologia
Auteur(s)
Borich M.R., Brodie S.M., Gray W.A., Ionta S., Boyd L.A.
ISSN
1873-3514 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0028-3932
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
79
Numéro
Pt B
Pages
246-255
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Emerging evidence indicates impairments in somatosensory function may be a major contributor to motor dysfunction associated with neurologic injury or disorders. However, the neuroanatomical substrates underlying the connection between aberrant sensory input and ineffective motor output are still under investigation. The primary somatosensory cortex (S1) plays a critical role in processing afferent somatosensory input and contributes to the integration of sensory and motor signals necessary for skilled movement. Neuroimaging and neurostimulation approaches provide unique opportunities to non-invasively study S1 structure and function including connectivity with other cortical regions. These research techniques have begun to illuminate casual contributions of abnormal S1 activity and connectivity to motor dysfunction and poorer recovery of motor function in neurologic patient populations. This review synthesizes recent evidence illustrating the role of S1 in motor control, motor learning and functional recovery with an emphasis on how information from these investigations may be exploited to inform stroke rehabilitation to reduce motor dysfunction and improve therapeutic outcomes.
Mots-clé
Electric Stimulation/methods, Humans, Movement Disorders/rehabilitation, Neuroimaging, Somatosensory Cortex/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
20/04/2016 11:28
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:00
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