Spatial genetic structure in the Laperrine's olive (Olea europaea subsp. laperrinei), a long-living tree from the central Saharan mountains.

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_D6AF9051DD75
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Spatial genetic structure in the Laperrine's olive (Olea europaea subsp. laperrinei), a long-living tree from the central Saharan mountains.
Périodique
Heredity
Auteur(s)
Besnard G., Christin P.A., Baali-Cherif D., Bouguedoura N., Anthelme F.
ISSN
0018-067X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
99
Numéro
6
Pages
649-657
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The Laperrine's olive (Olea europaea subsp. laperrinei) is an emblematic species of the Sahelo-Saharan Mountains. Populations of this tree are locally threatened by extinction due to climatic vicissitudes and human activities, particularly in Niger and Algeria. In order to study the spatial genetic structure and the dynamics of O. e. laperrinei populations, we sampled trees in four isolated mountain ranges (Tassili n'Ajjer and Hoggar (Algeria), Tamgak and Bagzane (Niger)). A total of 237 genets were identified using nuclear microsatellites. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on plastid DNA data supported a maternal origin of O. e. laperrinei populations in South Algeria, where a higher allelic richness was observed. Based on nuclear microsatellite data, two levels of structure were revealed: first, individuals from Niger and Algeria were separated in two distinct groups; second, four less differentiated clusters corresponded to the four studied mountain ranges. These results give support to the fact that desert barriers have greatly limited long distance gene flow. Within populations, pairwise kinship coefficients were significantly correlated to geographical distance for Niger populations but not for Algerian mountains. Historical factors and habitat heterogeneity may explain the differences observed. We conclude that the Hoggar acts as an important genetic reservoir that has to be taken into account in future conservation programmes. Moreover, very isolated endangered populations (for example, Bagzane) displaying evident genetic particularities have to be urgently considered for their endemism.
Mots-clé
Algeria, Genetic Markers, Niger, Olea/classification, Olea/genetics, Phylogeny, Plastids/genetics, Polymorphism, Genetic, Sudan, Time Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
19/03/2008 11:00
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:56
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