Continuous versus routine EEG in critically ill adults: reimbursement analysis of a randomised trial.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Urbano et al SMW 2021.pdf (576.58 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_D663E6419247
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Continuous versus routine EEG in critically ill adults: reimbursement analysis of a randomised trial.
Périodique
Swiss medical weekly
Auteur(s)
Urbano V., Novy J., Schindler K., Rüegg S., Alvarez V., Zubler F., Oddo M., Lee J.W., Rossetti A.O.
ISSN
1424-3997 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0036-7672
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
15/03/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
151
Pages
w20477
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Continuous EEG (cEEG) is increasingly used in critically ill patients, but it is more resource-intensive than routine EEG (rEEG). In the US, cEEG generates increased hospitalisation charges. This study analysed hospital-related reimbursement for participants in a Swiss multicentre randomised controlled trial that assessed the relationship of cEEG versus repeated rEEG with outcome.
We used data of the CERTA study (NCT03129438), including demographics, clinical variables and reimbursement for acute hospitalisations after the Swiss Diagnosis Related Groups billing system. In addition to a comparison between EEG intervention groups, we explored correlations with several clinical variables, using uni- and multivariate analyses.
In total, 366 adults were analysed (184 cEEG, 182 rEEG); 123 (33.6%) were women, mean age was 63.8 years (± 15). Median hospitalisation reimbursement was comparable across EEG groups in univariate analysis: cEEG CHF 89,631 (interquartile range [IQR] 45,635–159,994); rEEG CHF 73,017 (IQR 43,031–158,565); p = 0.432. However, multivariate regression disclosed that increasing reimbursement mostly correlated with longer acute hospitalisation (p <0.001), but also with cEEG (p = 0.019) and lack of seizure / status epilepticus detection (a surrogate of survival, p = 0.036).
In a Swiss Diagnosis Related Groups billing system applied to critically ill adults, reimbursement largely depends on duration of acute hospital stay, whereas cEEG and lack of seizure/ status epilepticus detection also contribute to the bill. This differs from the USA, where charges are directly increased by cEEG.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/04/2021 15:50
Dernière modification de la notice
29/06/2021 7:13
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