Use of the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) to detect cognitive impairment in the acute care setting: concurrent and predictive validity.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_D5A5DBBC2D43
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Use of the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) to detect cognitive impairment in the acute care setting: concurrent and predictive validity.
Périodique
Brain Research Bulletin
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Büla C.J., Wietlisbach V.
ISSN
1873-2747[electronic]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Volume
80
Numéro
4-5
Pages
173-178
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) was initially designed to assess cognition in long term care residents. Subsequently, the CPS has also been used among in-home, post-acute, and acute care populations even though CPS' clinimetric performance has not been studied in these settings. This study aimed to determine CPS agreement with the Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and its predictive validity for institutionalization and death in a cohort (N=401) of elderly medical inpatients aged 75 years and over. Medical, physical and mental status were assessed upon admission. The same day, the patient's nurse completed the CPS by interview. Follow-up data were gathered from the central billing system (nursing home stay) and proxies (death). Cognitive impairment was present in 92 (23%) patients according to CPS (score >or= 2). Agreement with MMSE was moderate (kappa 0.52, P<.001). Analysis of discordant results suggested that cognitive impairment was overestimated by the CPS in dependent patients with comorbidities and depressive symptoms, and underestimated in older ones. During follow-up, subjects with abnormal CPS had increased risks of death (adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.8, P=.035) and institutionalization (adjHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.3, P=.006), independent of demographic, health and functional status. Interestingly, subjects with abnormal CPS were at increased risk of death only if they also had abnormal MMSE. The CPS predicted death and institutionalization during follow-up, but correlated moderately well with the MMSE. Combining CPS and MMSE provided additional predictive information, suggesting that domains other than cognition are assessed by professionals when using the CPS in elderly medical inpatients.
Mots-clé
Cognitive impairment, Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS), Dementia, Delirium, Geriatric assessment, Minimum data set (MDS), Minimum Data Set, Elderly Medical Inpatients, Mental-State, 6-Month Outcomes, Mds, Reliability, Prevalence, Validation, Admission, Discharge
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
11/11/2009 14:09
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:55
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