Debris flows triggered from non-stationary glacier lake outbursts: the case of the Teztor Lake complex (Northern Tian Shan, Kyrgyzstan)

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_D58302574795
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Debris flows triggered from non-stationary glacier lake outbursts: the case of the Teztor Lake complex (Northern Tian Shan, Kyrgyzstan)
Périodique
Landslides
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Erokhin Sergey Aleksandrovich, Zaginaev Vitalii Viktorovich, Meleshko Anna Alexandrovna, Ruiz-Villanueva Virginia, Petrakov Dmitry Aleksandrovich, Chernomorets Sergey Semenovich, Viskhadzhieva Karina Saidovna, Tutubalina Olga Valerjevna, Stoffel Markus
ISSN
1612-510X
1612-5118
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
15
Numéro
1
Pages
83-98
Langue
anglais
Résumé
One of the most far-reaching glacier-related hazards in the Tian Shan Mountains of Kyrgyzstan is glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) and related debris flows. An improved understanding of the formation and evolution of glacial lakes and debris flow susceptibility is therefore essential to assess and mitigate potential hazards and risks. Non-stationary glacier lakes may fill periodically and quickly; the potential for them to outburst increases as water volume may change dramatically over very short periods of time. After the outburst or drainage of a lake, the entire process may start again, and thus these non-stationary lakes are of particular importance in the region. In this work, the Teztor lake complex, located in Northern Kyrgyzstan, was selected for the analysis of outburst mechanisms of non-stationary glacial lakes, their formation, as well as the triggering of flows and development of debris flows and floods downstream of the lakes. The different Teztor lakes are filled with water periodically, and according to field observations, they tend to outburst every 9–10 years on average. The most important event in the area dates back to 1953, and another important event occurred on July 31, 2012. Other smaller outbursts have been recorded as well. Our study shows that the recent GLOF in 2012 was caused by a combination of intense precipitation during the days preceding the event and a rapid rise in air temperatures. Analyses of features in the entrainment and depositional zones point to a total debris flow volume of about 200,000 m3, with discharge ranging from 145 to 340 m3 s−1 and flow velocities between 5 and 7 m s−1. Results of this study are key for a better design of sound river corridor planning and for the assessment and mitigation of potential GLOF hazards and risks in the region.
Mots-clé
Moraine complex, Intra-moraine channel, Glacier lake outburst flood, Debris flow, Tian Shan
Web of science
Financement(s)
Fonds national suisse / 152301
Création de la notice
17/10/2020 11:03
Dernière modification de la notice
13/12/2022 8:57
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