Residence time, expansion toward the equator in the invaded range and native range size matter to climatic niche shifts in non-native species

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_D13AFD469B41
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Residence time, expansion toward the equator in the invaded range and native range size matter to climatic niche shifts in non-native species
Périodique
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Auteur(s)
Li Y., Liu X., Li X., Petitpierre B., Guisan A.
ISSN
1466-8238 (electronic)
ISSN-L
1466-822X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Numéro
10
Pages
1094-1104
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Aim Identifying climatic niche shifts and their drivers is important to accurately predict the risk of biological invasions. The niches of non-native plants and birds have recently been assessed in large-scale multi-species studies, but such large-scale tests are lacking for non-native reptiles and amphibians (herpetofauna). Furthermore, little is known about the factors contributing to niche shifts when they occur. Based on the occurrence of 71 reptile and amphibian species, we compared native and non-native realized niches in 101 invaded ranges at a worldwide scale and identified the factors that affect niche shifts.
Location The world except the Antarctic.
Methods We assessed climatic niche dynamics in a gridded environmental space allowing the quantification of niche overlap and expansion into climatic conditions not colonized by the species in their native range. We analyzed the factors affecting niche shifts using a model averaging approach based on generalized linear mixed-effects models.
Results Approximately 57% of the invaded ranges (51% for amphibians and 61% for reptiles) showed niche shifts (≥10% expansion in the realized climatic niche). Island endemics, species introduced to Oceania and invaded ranges outside the native biogeographic realm showed a higher proportion of niche shifts. Niche shifts were more likely for species that had smaller native range sizes, were introduced earlier into a new range or invaded areas located at lower latitudes than the native range.
Main conclusions The proportion of niche shifts for non-native herpetofauna was higher than those for Holarctic non-native plants and European non-native birds. The 'climate matching hypothesis' should be used with caution for species shifting their niche because it could underestimate the risk of their establishment.
Mots-clé
Climate match, ecological niche models (ENMs), expansion towards equator, native range size, niche shifts, non-native species, realized climatic niche, residence time
Web of science
Création de la notice
02/03/2014 2:18
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:51
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