Lactate and the injured brain: friend or foe?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_D0BCE03FBB74
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Lactate and the injured brain: friend or foe?
Périodique
Current Opinion in Critical Care
Auteur(s)
Bouzat P., Oddo M.
ISSN
1531-7072 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1070-5295
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Numéro
2
Pages
133-140
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Document Type: Review, pdf REVIEW
Résumé
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Energy metabolism is increasingly recognized as a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute brain injury (ABI). We review the role of cerebral lactate metabolism and summarize evidence showing that lactate may act as supplemental fuel after ABI.
RECENT FINDINGS: The role of cerebral lactate has shifted from a waste product to a potentially preferential fuel and signaling molecule. According to the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle model, glycolytic lactate might act as glucose-sparing substrate. Lactate also is emerging as a key signal to regulate cerebral blood flow (CBF) and a neuroprotective agent after experimental ABI. Clinical investigation using cerebral microdialysis shows the existence of two main lactate patterns, ischemic - from anaerobic metabolism - and nonischemic, from activated glycolysis, whereby lactate can be used as supplemental energy fuel. Preliminary clinical data suggests hypertonic lactate solutions improve cerebral energy metabolism and are an effective treatment for elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) after ABI.
SUMMARY: Lactate can be a supplemental fuel for the injured brain and is important to regulate glucose metabolism and CBF. Exogenous lactate supplementation may be neuroprotective after experimental ABI. Recent clinical data from ABI patients suggest hypertonic lactate solutions may be a valid therapeutic option for secondary energy dysfunction and elevated ICP.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/04/2014 17:31
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:51
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