Freezing of gait and white matter changes: a tract-based spatial statistics study.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_CDA22A9D30F6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Freezing of gait and white matter changes: a tract-based spatial statistics study.
Périodique
Journal of Clinical Movement Disorders
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Iseki K., Fukuyama H., Oishi N., Tomimoto H., Otsuka Y., Nankaku M., Benninger D., Hallett M., Hanakawa T.
ISSN
2054-7072 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2054-7072
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
2
Pages
1
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that the integrity of white matter might be related to the severity of freezing of gait in age-related white matter changes.
METHODS: Twenty subjects exhibiting excessive hyperintensities in the periventricular and deep white matter were recruited. The subjects underwent the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire, computerized gait analyses, and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. Images of axial, radial and mean diffusivity, and fractional anisotropy were calculated as indices of white matter integrity and analyzed with tract-based spatial statistics.
RESULTS: The fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity averaged across the whole white matter structure were all significantly correlated with Freezing of Gait Questionnaire scores. Regionally, a negative correlation between Freezing of Gait Questionnaire scores and fractional anisotropy was found in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus beneath the left premotor cortex, right corpus callosum, and left cerebral peduncle. The scores of the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire were positively correlated with mean diffusivity in the left corona radiata and right corpus callosum, and with both axial and radial diffusivity in the left corona radiata. The white matter integrity in these tracts (except the corpus callosum) showed no correlation with cognitive or other gait measures, supporting the specificity of those abnormalities to freezing of gait.
CONCLUSION: Divergent pathological lesions involved neural circuits composed of the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and brainstem, suggesting that freezing of gait has a multifactorial nature.
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
11/02/2016 11:09
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:48
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