Blood sampling methodology is crucial for precise measurement of plasma catecholamines concentrations in mice.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: serval:BIB_CD6361A9EDD6.P001 (168.77 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
Licence: Non spécifiée
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ID Serval
serval:BIB_CD6361A9EDD6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Blood sampling methodology is crucial for precise measurement of plasma catecholamines concentrations in mice.
Périodique
Pflügers Archiv
Auteur(s)
Grouzmann E., Cavadas C., Grand D., Moratel M., Aubert J.F., Brunner H.R., Mazzolai L.
ISSN
0031-6768
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2003
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
447
Numéro
2
Pages
254-258
Langue
anglais
Notes
Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Nov
Résumé
Epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) play a major role in regulating metabolism and cardiovascular physiology. Both are secreted in response to stress and their measurement in plasma allows the study of sympathoadrenal function. Several studies investigating sympathoadrenal physiology are conducted using mice. Review of the literature revealed that basal mouse NE and E plasma concentrations range within 4-140 nM depending on the blood sampling method. Such variability doesn't allow study comparison and may conceal catecholamine variations in response to stress. Therefore, our aim was to determine a reliable sampling method to measure mouse plasma catecholamine concentrations. Results showed that arterial catheterization is the most accurate sampling method: E and NE basal levels were similar to those found in humans (1.1+/-0.3 nM and 4.1+/-0.5 nM, respectively). Retro-orbital bleeding led to analogous results. On the contrary, decapitation was stressful for mice and consequently NE and E concentrations were high (24.6+/-2.7 nM and 27.3+/-3.8 nM, respectively). These different bleeding methods were compared in terms of their ability to detect sympathoadrenal system stimulation (cold-pressure test). With catheter and retro-orbital samplings the expected increase in NE and E levels was easily perceived. In contrast, with decapitation no significant change in E was detected. In conclusion, arterial-catheter and retro-orbital blood sampling methods appear to be the most accurate procedures for studying the sympathetic nervous system in mice in both unstressed and stressed conditions.
Mots-clé
Animals, Arteries, Blood Pressure, Blood Specimen Collection, Catecholamines, Catheterization, Cold Temperature, Epinephrine, Female, Heart Rate, Male, Mice, Orbit, Osmolar Concentration, Stress, Physiological
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 11:55
Dernière modification de la notice
01/10/2019 7:19
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