Elevated lead and zinc contents in remote alpine soils of the Swiss National Park.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_BE514FA8DCEE
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Elevated lead and zinc contents in remote alpine soils of the Swiss National Park.
Périodique
Journal of Environmental Quality
Auteur(s)
Nowack B., Obrecht J.M., Schluep M., Schulin R., Hansmann W., Köppel V.
ISSN
0047-2425
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
06/2001
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
30
Numéro
3
Pages
919-926
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Weathering of bedrock and pedogenic processes can result in elevated heavy metal concentrations in the soil. Small-scale variations in bedrock composition can therefore cause local variations in the metal content of the soil. Such a case was found in the remote alpine area of the Swiss National Park. Soil profiles were sampled at an altitude of about 2,400 m, representing soils developed above different bedrocks. The concentration of lead in the profiles was found to be strongly dependent on the metal content in the bedrock underlying the soil and was strongly enriched in the top 10 cm. The dolomitic bedrock in the study area contains elevated lead concentrations compared with other dolomites. Dissolution of dolomite and accumulation of weathering residues during soil formation resulted in high lead concentrations throughout the soil profile. The enrichment of lead in the topsoil, however, is largely attributed to atmospheric input. The isotopic signature of the lead clearly indicates that it is mainly of natural origin and that atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic lead contributed to about 20 to 40% to the lead concentration in the topsoil on the bedrock with elevated lead concentrations. In the soils on bedrock with normal lead concentrations, the anthropogenic contribution is estimated to be about 75%. Also, zinc was very strongly enriched in the topsoil. This enrichment was closely correlated with the organic matter distribution in the profiles, suggesting that recycling through plant uptake and litter deposition was a dominant process in the long-term retention of this metal in the soil.
Mots-clé
Environmental Monitoring, Geological Phenomena, Geology, Lead/analysis, Organic Chemicals, Plant Leaves/metabolism, Soil Microbiology, Soil Pollutants/analysis, Switzerland, Zinc/analysis
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 13:46
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:32
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