Masculinity and Nation in the Popular Fiction of the Spanish American War: Kirk Munroe's Forward, March!

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_BA3C36E9B12F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Masculinity and Nation in the Popular Fiction of the Spanish American War: Kirk Munroe's Forward, March!
Périodique
Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies
Auteur(s)
Soltysik Monnet A.
ISSN
1218-7364
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
22
Numéro
1
Pages
11-32
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Although the first accounts of the Spanish-American War in 1898 were written by journalists, including the novelist Stephen Crane, book-length memoirs such as Theodore Roosevelt's The Rough Riders (1899) and fiction novels such as Kirk Munroe's Forward, March! (1899) were not far behind. The war was quickly won but the battle over how to narrate, represent, and remember it raged in full force during the years that followed. The stakes were high: not only the question of foreign policy and America's right to control Caribbean territories, but the definition of American nationhood itself seemed bound up with the issue of American men's performance in battle. Race was a major axis of debate and ideological pressure, but class was also important as a vector of ideological tension and containment.1 Appearing at nearly the same time as Roosevelt's, Forward March! narrates the exploits of the Rough Riders, but in a fictionalized form written for young readers and focusing on a fictional protagonist. A coming of age story staged in the theater of war, the novel interweaves the issue of manhood with a larger story of national honor, victory and belonging. Precisely because it is written as an adventure story, and by definition accessible, emotionally engaging and stereotyped, Forward, March! reveals the mechanisms that bound masculinity, nationalism and militarism together in a combination that would profoundly influence twentieth-century American culture. In particular, the novel navigates the transition between earlier nineteenth-century notions of masculinity based on chivalry and self-restraint and a new definition emerging in the 1890s, favoring physical prowess, military experience and active patriotism. In doing so, Forward, March! helped create a conflicted and contradictory masculinity that would inaugurate a century of imperial violence.
Mots-clé
American literature, Spanish-American War, masculinity, nationalism, adventure
Création de la notice
24/05/2016 8:03
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:28
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