Codon Usage Bias in Animals: Disentangling the Effects of Natural Selection, Effective Population Size, and GC-Biased Gene Conversion.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_B980B2DC1F15
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Codon Usage Bias in Animals: Disentangling the Effects of Natural Selection, Effective Population Size, and GC-Biased Gene Conversion.
Périodique
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Auteur(s)
Galtier N., Roux C., Rousselle M., Romiguier J., Figuet E., Glémin S., Bierne N., Duret L.
ISSN
1537-1719 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0737-4038
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
35
Numéro
5
Pages
1092-1103
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Selection on codon usage bias is well documented in a number of microorganisms. Whether codon usage is also generally shaped by natural selection in large organisms, despite their relatively small effective population size (Ne), is unclear. In animals, the population genetics of codon usage bias has only been studied in a handful of model organisms so far, and can be affected by confounding, nonadaptive processes such as GC-biased gene conversion and experimental artefacts. Using population transcriptomics data, we analyzed the relationship between codon usage, gene expression, allele frequency distribution, and recombination rate in 30 nonmodel species of animals, each from a different family, covering a wide range of effective population sizes. We disentangled the effects of translational selection and GC-biased gene conversion on codon usage by separately analyzing GC-conservative and GC-changing mutations. We report evidence for effective translational selection on codon usage in large-Ne species of animals, but not in small-Ne ones, in agreement with the nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution. C- and T-ending codons tend to be preferred over synonymous G- and A-ending ones, for reasons that remain to be determined. In contrast, we uncovered a conspicuous effect of GC-biased gene conversion, which is widespread in animals and the main force determining the fate of AT↔GC mutations. Intriguingly, the strength of its effect was uncorrelated with Ne.
Mots-clé
Animals, Base Composition, Codon, Gene Conversion, Insecta/genetics, Population Density, Selection, Genetic, Silent Mutation
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
14/04/2019 15:58
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:27
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