How demography, life history, and kinship shape the evolution of genomic imprinting.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_B72D85E0EA34.P001.pdf (2428.62 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_B72D85E0EA34
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
How demography, life history, and kinship shape the evolution of genomic imprinting.
Périodique
American Naturalist
Auteur(s)
Van Cleve J., Feldman M.W., Lehmann L.
ISSN
1537-5323 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0003-0147
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
176
Numéro
4
Pages
440-455
Langue
anglais
Résumé
How phenomena like helping, dispersal, or the sex ratio evolve depends critically on demographic and life-history factors. One phenotype that is of particular interest to biologists is genomic imprinting, which results in parent-of-origin-specific gene expression and thus deviates from the predictions of Mendel's rules. The most prominent explanation for the evolution of genomic imprinting, the kinship theory, originally specified that multiple paternity can cause the evolution of imprinting when offspring affect maternal resource provisioning. Most models of the kinship theory do not detail how population subdivision, demography, and life history affect the evolution of imprinting. In this work, we embed the classic kinship theory within an island model of population structure and allow for diverse demographic and life-history features to affect the direction of selection on imprinting. We find that population structure does not change how multiple paternity affects the evolution of imprinting under the classic kinship theory. However, if the degree of multiple paternity is not too large, we find that sex-specific migration and survival and generation overlap are the primary factors determining which allele is silenced. This indicates that imprinting can evolve purely as a result of sex-related asymmetries in the demographic structure or life history of a species.
Mots-clé
Animal Migration, Animals, Biological Evolution, Female, Fertility, Gene Frequency, Genomic Imprinting, Genotype, Male, Models, Genetic, Phenotype, Sex Ratio, Sexual Behavior, Animal
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
04/05/2011 15:07
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:25
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