Are healthcare workers more likely than the general population to consult in primary care for an influenza-like illness? Results from a case-control study.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_B289E2C7AEAA
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Are healthcare workers more likely than the general population to consult in primary care for an influenza-like illness? Results from a case-control study.
Périodique
Influenza and other respiratory viruses
Auteur(s)
Peytremann A., Senn N., Mueller Y.
ISSN
1750-2659 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1750-2640
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
14
Numéro
5
Pages
524-529
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Healthcare workers are at increased risk of contracting influenza. However, existing studies do not differentiate professional categories or domains of the healthcare system that are most at risk.
This case-control study compared proportions of patients with professional activity in the healthcare system between cases consulting their primary care physician for an influenza-like illness (ILI) and controls from the general patient population of the same practices of the Swiss sentinel network. Influenza was confirmed by rRT-PCR in a subset of practices. Analysis used a mixed logistic regression model, including age and sex as potential confounders.
During the 2018/2019 influenza surveillance season, out of 4287 ILI cases and 28 561 controls reported in 168 practices, 235 (5.5%), respectively 872 (3.1%), were active in the healthcare system. After adjustment, being active in health care increased the odds of consulting for an ILI (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.40-1.97). The association was strongest for physicians and nursing aides. In terms of work setting, odds of consulting for ILI were increased for professionals of almost all healthcare settings except home-based care.
Individuals active in the healthcare system were more likely to consult their primary care physician for an influenza-like illness than for another reason, compared with individuals not active in the healthcare system. These results warrant further efforts to understand influenza transmission in the healthcare system at large.
Mots-clé
Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health, Epidemiology, Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine, Infectious Diseases, epidemiology, human, influenza, occupations, prevention and control, primary health care
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
07/05/2020 12:03
Dernière modification de la notice
14/11/2020 7:10
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