How to keep the brain awake? : pharmacogenomics and aging effects on sleep-wake regulation in inbred mice

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Demande d'une copie
ID Serval
serval:BIB_ACCB44ADEBC4
Type
Thèse: thèse de doctorat.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
How to keep the brain awake? : pharmacogenomics and aging effects on sleep-wake regulation in inbred mice
Auteur(s)
Hasan S.
Directeur(s)
Tafti M.
Détails de l'institution
Université de Lausanne, Faculté de biologie et médecine
Adresse
Faculté de biologie et de médecine Université de Lausanne UNIL - Bugnon Rue du Bugnon 21 - bureau 4111 CH-1015 Lausanne SUISSE
Statut éditorial
Acceptée
Date de publication
2008
Langue
anglais
Nombre de pages
203
Notes
REROID:R005103383 ill.
Résumé
ABSTRACT :
Genetic approach in the sleep field is at the beginning of its wide expansion. Transitions between sleep and wakefulness, and the maintenance of these states are driven by complex neurobiologic mechanisms with reciprocal interactions. Impairment in both transitions and maintenance of behavioral states leads to debilitating conditions. The major symptom being excessive daytime sleepiness, characterizing most sleep disorders but also a wide variety of psychiatric and neurologic disorders, as well as the elderly. Until now, most wake-promoting drugs available directly (e.g., amphetamines and possibly modafinil) or indirectly (e.g., caffeine) provokes dopamine release which is believed to influence the abuse potential of these drugs. The effects of genetic components were assessed here, on drug-induced wakefulness and age-related sleep changes in three inbred mouse strains [AKR/J, C57BL/6J, DBA/2J] that differ in their major sleep phenotypes. Three wake-promoting drugs were used; d-amphetamine, a classical stimulant, modafinil, the most widely-prescribed stimulant, and YKP-10A, a novel wake-promoting agent with antidepressant proprieties. Electrical activity (Electroencephalogram) and gene expression of the brain were assessed and indicate a highly genotype-dependant response to wake promotion and subsequent recovery sleep. Aging effects on sleep-wake regulation were also strongly influenced by genetic determinants. By assessing the age-dependant effects at several time points (from 3 months to 2 years old mice), we found a strong genetic effect on vigilance states. These studies demonstrate a critical role for genetic factors neglected till now in the fields of pharmacology and aging effects on vigilance states.
Création de la notice
22/06/2010 14:10
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:16
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