Proteomic analysis of Intercept-treated platelets.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_AB49B111883F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Proteomic analysis of Intercept-treated platelets.
Périodique
Journal of Proteomics
Auteur(s)
Prudent M., Crettaz D., Delobel J., Tissot J.D., Lion N.
ISSN
1876-7737 (Electronic)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
76
Numéro
Spec. Is.
Pages
316-328
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
In the past decades, transfusion medicine has been driven by the quest for increased safety against transfusion-transmitted infections, mainly by better donor selection and by the development of improved serological and nucleic-acid-based screening assays. Recently, pathogen reduction technologies became available and started to be implemented in several countries, with the primary goal to fight against bacterial contamination of blood products, a rare but dramatic event against which there was no definitive measure. Though pathogen reduction technologies represent a quantum leap in transfusion safety, the biomedical efficacy of platelet concentrates (PCs) treated with various pathogen reduction techniques has been recently questioned by clinical studies. Here, a gel-based proteomic analysis of PCs (n=5), Intercept-treated or untreated, from pooled buffy-coat (10 donors per PC) at Days 1, 2 and 8, shows that the Intercept process that is the most widespread pathogen reduction technique to date, has relatively low impact on the proteome of treated platelets: the process induces modifications of DJ-1 protein, glutaredoxin 5, and G(i)alpha 2 protein. As for the impact of storage, chloride intracellular channel protein 4 (CLIC4) and actin increased independently of Intercept treatment during storage. Whereas alteration of the DJ-1 protein and glutaredoxin 5 points out an oxidative stress-associated lesion, modification of G(i)alpha2 directly connects a possible Intercept-associated lesion to haemostatic properties of Intercept-treated platelets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
03/01/2013 16:59
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:15
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