Prior family communication and consent to organ donation: Using intensive care physicians' perception to model decision processes

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_A5A552DF00A4
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Prior family communication and consent to organ donation: Using intensive care physicians' perception to model decision processes
Périodique
Journal of Public Health Research
Auteur(s)
Schulz P. J., van Ackere A., Hartung U., Dunkel A.
ISSN
2279-9028
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
04/2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
1
Numéro
2
Pages
130-136
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Generally, the Swiss hold favourable attitudes to organ donation, but only few carry a donor card. If no card is found on a potential donor, families have to be approached about donation. The aim of this paper is to model the role that some family communication factors play in the family decision to consent or not to organ donation by a brain dead relative. Information was gathered in face-to-face interviews, using a questionnaire and recording open answers and comments. Eight heads of intensive care units (ICU) of Swiss hospitals and one representative from Swisstransplant were interviewed. Questions asked respondents to estimate the prevalence and effect of communication factors in families facing a decision to consent to donation. Answers were averaged for modelling purposes. Modelling also relies on a previous representative population survey for cross-validation. The family of the deceased person is almost always approached about donation. Physicians perceive that prior thinking and favourable predisposition to donation are correlated and that the relatives' predisposition is the most important factor for the consent to donation, up to the point that a negative predisposition may override an acknowledged wish of the deceased to donate. Donor cards may trigger family communication and ease the physicians' approach to family about donation. Campaigns should encourage donate-willing people to talk to their families about it, make people think about organ donation and try to change unfavourable predispositions.
Mots-clé
family consent, organ donation, organ donor card
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
20/11/2012 16:31
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 6:10
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