Vocal communication regulates sibling competition over food stock

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_A373E9F4084D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Vocal communication regulates sibling competition over food stock
Périodique
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Auteur(s)
Dreiss A.N., Gaime F., Delarbre A., Moroni L., Lenarth M., Roulin A.
ISSN
1432-0762
ISSN-L
0340-5443
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
70
Numéro
6
Pages
927-937
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Animals resolve conflicts over the share of resources by competing physically or signalling motivation with honest signals of need. In some species, young siblings vocally signal to each other their hunger level and the most vocal individual deters its siblings from competing for the non-divisible food item delivered at the next parental visit. This so-called sibling negotiation for forthcoming food has been studied only in this context. It therefore remains unclear whether siblings could also negotiate access to a pool of divisible resources, a situation that is similar to a group of individuals competing for an accessible food resource. To tackle this issue, we placed barn owl (Tyto alba) nestlings singly in artificial nests containing several mice, and we simulated the presence of a sibling calling at low or high rate using playback experiments. If nestling barn owls vocally negotiate over a divisible food stock, we propose the following two predictions. First, nestlings would vocally signal before eating from this stock of food, and second, numerous playback vocalizations would inhibit feeding. Accordingly, singleton nestlings vocalized just before consuming food stored in their artificial nest and they delayed the consumption of the food stock if hearing many playback calls. The production of such food-associated vocalizations has been observed in foraging adults in various birds and mammals, but never in young animals and when resource is divisible and easily accessible. Our study raises the possibility that vocal communication could evolve in a variety of competitive contexts.
We present here the first experimental evidence that sibling barn owls use food-associated vocalizations to compete over the preys stored in the nest. Owlets emit calls just before consuming an available food item and broadcasting calls induces nestlings to temporarily refrain from eating from the food stock. This raises the possibility that vocal communication can mediate the share of a food stock accessible to all competitors.
Mots-clé
Conflict, Food-associated call, Food stock, Negotiation, Sibling competition, Vocal communication, Barn owl, Tyto alba
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/03/2016 23:00
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:09
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