Validity of silhouette showcards as a measure of body size and obesity in a population in the African region : a practical research tool for general-purpose surveys.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_A2D428310127.P001.pdf (870.53 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_A2D428310127
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Validity of silhouette showcards as a measure of body size and obesity in a population in the African region : a practical research tool for general-purpose surveys.
Périodique
Population Health Metrics
Auteur(s)
Yepes M., Viswanathan B., Bovet P., Maurer J.
ISSN
1478-7954 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1478-7954
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Pages
35
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to validate the Pulvers silhouette showcard as a measure of weight status in a population in the African region. This tool is particularly beneficial when scarce resources do not allow for direct anthropometric measurements due to limited survey time or lack of measurement technology in face-to-face general-purpose surveys or in mailed, online, or mobile device-based surveys.
METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Republic of Seychelles with a sample of 1240 adults. We compared self-reported body sizes measured by Pulvers' silhouette showcards to four measurements of body size and adiposity: body mass index (BMI), body fat percent measured, waist circumference, and waist to height ratio. The accuracy of silhouettes as an obesity indicator was examined using sex-specific receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis and the reliability of this tool to detect socioeconomic gradients in obesity was compared to BMI-based measurements.
RESULTS: Our study supports silhouette body size showcards as a valid and reliable survey tool to measure self-reported body size and adiposity in an African population. The mean correlation coefficients of self-reported silhouettes with measured BMI were 0.80 in men and 0.81 in women (P < 0.001). The silhouette showcards also showed high accuracy for detecting obesity as per a BMI ≥ 30 (Area under curve, AUC: 0.91/0.89, SE: 0.01), which was comparable to other measured adiposity indicators: fat percent (AUC: 0.94/0.94, SE: 0.01), waist circumference (AUC: 0.95/0.94, SE: 0.01), and waist to height ratio (AUC: 0.95/0.94, SE: 0.01) amongst men and women, respectively. The use of silhouettes in detecting obesity differences among different socioeconomic groups resulted in similar magnitude, direction, and significance of association between obesity and socioeconomic status as when using measured BMI.
CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the validity and reliability of silhouettes as a survey tool for measuring obesity in a population in the African region. The ease of use and cost-effectiveness of this tool makes it an attractive alternative to measured BMI in the design of non-face-to-face online- or mobile device-based surveys as well as in-person general-purpose surveys of obesity in social sciences, where limited resources do not allow for direct anthropometric measurements.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/01/2016 9:45
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:08
Données d'usage