All is Connected to All (Beyond Normative Perception): Maxine Hong Kingston and the Psychedelic Politics of the Counterculture

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Ressource 1Télécharger: Pharmakon essay on Kingston.pdf (177.65 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_A0BE2A5707FB
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
All is Connected to All (Beyond Normative Perception): Maxine Hong Kingston and the Psychedelic Politics of the Counterculture
Titre du livre
The Pharmakon: Concept Figure, Image of Transgression, Poetic Practice
Auteur(s)
Soltysik Monnet Agnieszka
Editeur
Heidelberg University Press
Lieu d'édition
Heidelberg
ISBN
978-3-8253-6740-4
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Editeur scientifique
Herlinghaus Hermann
Pages
125-144
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Few moments in history are so intensely associated with widespread drug use as the 1960s in the United States. The American counterculture scene is unimaginable without its defining attitudes towards and sustained practice of smoking marijuana and “dropping acid,” i.e. taking LSD (other drugs were used but none became as foundational to the counterculture lifestyle and ethos as these two). Yet, regrettably, these psychedelic experiences produced relatively little memorable literature as much of the creative energy of the drug movement went into the visual arts, music, guerrilla theater and experimental performance art. Although the Beats (Ginsberg, Kerouac, Burroughs) engaged with drug use in their literary work of the 1950s, they referred mainly to heroine, marijuana and amphetamines. In the 1960s, the few authors of what we could call a literature of psychedelic experience are Hunter S. Thompson, Ken Kesey, Tom Woolf (writing about Ken Kesey), and the anthropologist (and possibly hoaxer) Carlos Castaneda (writing of peyote). Yet there is another writer who has produced a rich and sustained literary archive of West Coast counterculture and its fascination with psychedelia. Maxine Hong Kingston has been read and studied since the mis-1970s as a foundational figure of Chinese American literature and studies, and a key author of American women’s literary autobiography, but she has never been read as a literary hippie or major voice of the 1960s counterculture. This essay aims to challenge that oversight, showing how Kingston's novels constitute a profound and extensive account of psychedelic experience as it was lived and understood in the Bay Area of the 1960s.

Mots-clé
Maxine Hong Kingston, counterculture, LSD, psychedelic writing, hippies
Création de la notice
05/08/2018 15:09
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:06
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