Agricultural trade policies and child nutrition in low- and middle-income countries: a cross-national analysis.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_99FBA20356C5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Agricultural trade policies and child nutrition in low- and middle-income countries: a cross-national analysis.
Périodique
Globalization and health
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Adjaye-Gbewonyo K., Vollmer S., Avendano M., Harttgen K.
ISSN
1744-8603 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1744-8603
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
15/03/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
15
Numéro
1
Pages
21
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
There has been growing interest in understanding the role of agricultural trade policies in diet and nutrition. This cross-country study examines associations between government policies on agricultural trade prices and child nutrition outcomes, particularly undernutrition.
This study links panel data on government distortions to agricultural incentives to data from 212,258 children aged 6 to 35 months participating in Demographic and Health Surveys from 22 countries between 1991 and 2010. Country fixed-effects regression models were used to examine the association between within-country changes in nominal rates of assistance to tradable agriculture (government price distortions as a percentage of original prices) and child nutritional outcomes (height-for-age, weight-for-age, and weight-for-height Z-scores) while controlling for a range of time-varying country covariates.
Five-year average nominal rates of assistance to tradable agriculture ranged from - 72.0 to 45.5% with a mean of - 5.0% and standard deviation of 18.9 percentage points. A 10-percentage point increase in five-year average rates of assistance to tradable agriculture was associated with improved height-for-age (0.02, 95% CI: 0.00-0.05) and weight-for-age (0.05, 95% CI: 0.02-0.09) Z-scores. Improvements in nutritional status were greatest among children who had at least one parent earning wages in agriculture, and effects decreased as a country's proportion of tradable agriculture increased, particularly for weight-for-age Z-scores.
Government assistance to tradable agriculture, such as through reduced taxation, was associated with small but significant improvements in child nutritional status, especially for children with a parent earning wages in agriculture when the share of tradable agriculture was not high.
Mots-clé
Agriculture, Child Nutrition Disorders/epidemiology, Child, Preschool, Commerce, Demography, Developing Countries, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Policy, Food prices, Liberalization, Nominal rate of assistance, Nutrition status, Trade
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
18/10/2021 14:59
Dernière modification de la notice
19/10/2021 6:40
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