Mobile dual eye-tracking in face-to-face interaction : The case of deixis and joint attention

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_98E64136FA55
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Mobile dual eye-tracking in face-to-face interaction : The case of deixis and joint attention
Titre du livre
Advances in Interaction Studies
Auteur(s)
Stukenbrock Anja
Editeur
John Benjamins Publishing Company
ISBN
9789027201522
9789027263469
ISSN
1879-873X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
23/10/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Editeur scientifique
Brône Geert, Oben Bent
Numéro de chapitre
11
Pages
265-302
Langue
anglais
Résumé
In face-to-face interaction deixis, i.e. (the use of) a particular class of linguistic items that have grammaticalised the space-, time- and person-bound structure of the participants’ subjective orientation in the speech event (Bühler, 1965[1934]), is intricately connected to visible acts of demonstration (prototypically pointing) and joint attention. A growing body of publications within the field of conversation analysis and research on multimodality acknowledges the central role that pointing plays in acts of deictic reference (Eriksson, 2009; Fricke, 2007; Goodwin, 2003; Kendon, 2004; Kita, 2003; Mondada, 2012a; Stukenbrock, 2009, 2014a, 2014b, 2015). Surprisingly, eye gaze has remained an unexplored area although it serves a variety of crucial functions in the participants’ on-line organisation of a joint focus of attention on deictically foregrounded entities in the immediate spatial surroundings (Stukenbrock, 2009, 2010, 2014a, 2014b, 2015). The few existing studies mainly rely on video-recordings that do not allow a precise analysis of eye gaze.Drawing on innovative mobile eye-tracking technology, my paper explores different forms of gaze behaviour that systematically occur when participants direct their interlocutor’s attention to visible entities in the surroundings by means of deictic pointing. My data consists of mobile eye-tracking recordings undertaken with two pairs of eye-tracking glasses worn by participants in non-laboratory, everyday settings ((1) shopping together at a market, (2) searching for a book in a library, (3) conducting an informal conversation). The analysis is based on frame-precisely synchronised split-screen videos consisting of two complementary eye-tracking videos which allow a moment-by-moment reconstruction of the way in which the participants coordinate talk, body movements and gaze in the emergent interaction.
Création de la notice
02/12/2020 20:47
Dernière modification de la notice
04/12/2020 7:24
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