Trained Immunity Confers Broad-Spectrum Protection Against Bacterial Infections.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 31889191_BIB_98E5CDC87421.pdf (4896.24 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_98E5CDC87421
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Trained Immunity Confers Broad-Spectrum Protection Against Bacterial Infections.
Périodique
The Journal of infectious diseases
Auteur(s)
Ciarlo E., Heinonen T., Théroude C., Asgari F., Le Roy D., Netea M.G., Roger T.
ISSN
1537-6613 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0022-1899
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/11/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
222
Numéro
11
Pages
1869-1881
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The innate immune system recalls a challenge to adapt to a secondary challenge, a phenomenon called trained immunity. Training involves cellular metabolic, epigenetic and functional reprogramming, but how broadly trained immunity protects from infections is unknown. For the first time, we addressed whether trained immunity provides protection in a large panel of preclinical models of infections.
Mice were trained and subjected to systemic infections, peritonitis, enteritis, and pneumonia induced by Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter rodentium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacteria, cytokines, leukocytes, and hematopoietic precursors were quantified in blood, bone marrow, and organs. The role of monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, and interleukin 1 signaling was investigated using depletion or blocking approaches.
Induction of trained immunity protected mice in all preclinical models, including when training and infection were initiated in distant organs. Trained immunity increased bone marrow hematopoietic progenitors, blood Ly6Chigh inflammatory monocytes and granulocytes, and sustained blood antimicrobial responses. Monocytes/macrophages and interleukin 1 signaling were required to protect trained mice from listeriosis. Trained mice were efficiently protected from peritonitis and listeriosis for up to 5 weeks.
Trained immunity confers broad-spectrum protection against lethal bacterial infections. These observations support the development of trained immunity-based strategies to improve host defenses.
Mots-clé
Infection, Innate immunity, Listeria, Monocyte/Macrophage, Neutrophil, Peritonitis, Pneumonia, Sepsis, Trained immunity, stem cell, innate immunity, infection, monocyte/macrophage, neutrophil, peritonitis, pneumonia, sepsis, trained immunity, Listeria, innate immunity
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
03/01/2020 22:25
Dernière modification de la notice
30/04/2021 7:13
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