A genome-wide investigation of adaptive signatures in protein-coding genes related to tool behaviour in New Caledonian and Hawaiian crows.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_970EA2875929
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
A genome-wide investigation of adaptive signatures in protein-coding genes related to tool behaviour in New Caledonian and Hawaiian crows.
Périodique
Molecular ecology
Auteur(s)
Dussex N., Kutschera V.E., Wiberg RAW, Parker D.J., Hunt G.R., Gray R.D., Rutherford K., Abe H., Fleischer R.C., Ritchie M.G., Rutz C., Wolf JBW, Gemmell N.J.
ISSN
1365-294X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0962-1083
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
30
Numéro
4
Pages
973-986
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Very few animals habitually manufacture and use tools. It has been suggested that advanced tool behaviour co-evolves with a suite of behavioural, morphological and life history traits. In fact, there are indications for such an adaptive complex in tool-using crows (genus Corvus species). Here, we sequenced the genomes of two habitually tool-using and ten non-tool-using crow species to search for genomic signatures associated with a tool-using lifestyle. Using comparative genomic and population genetic approaches, we screened for signals of selection in protein-coding genes in the tool-using New Caledonian and Hawaiian crows. While we detected signals of recent selection in New Caledonian crows near genes associated with bill morphology, our data indicate that genetic changes in these two lineages are surprisingly subtle, with little evidence at present for convergence. We explore the biological explanations for these findings, such as the relative roles of gene regulation and protein-coding changes, as well as the possibility that statistical power to detect selection in recently diverged lineages may have been insufficient. Our study contributes to a growing body of literature aiming to decipher the genetic basis of recently evolved complex behaviour.
Mots-clé
Animals, Crows/genetics, Hawaii, Life History Traits, Tool Use Behavior, corvids, genomics, selection, tool use
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
22/12/2020 10:48
Dernière modification de la notice
30/06/2021 5:34
Données d'usage