Changes in gene DNA methylation and expression networks accompany caste specialization and age-related physiological changes in a social insect.

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_96CF41E0298A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Changes in gene DNA methylation and expression networks accompany caste specialization and age-related physiological changes in a social insect.
Périodique
Molecular ecology
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Morandin C., Brendel V.P., Sundström L., Helanterä H., Mikheyev A.S.
ISSN
1365-294X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0962-1083
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
04/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
28
Numéro
8
Pages
1975-1993
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Social insects provide systems for studying epigenetic regulation of phenotypes, particularly with respect to differentiation of reproductive and worker castes, which typically arise from a common genetic background. The role of gene expression in caste specialization has been extensively studied, but the role of DNA methylation remains controversial. Here, we perform well replicated, integrated analyses of DNA methylation and gene expression in brains of an ant (Formica exsecta) with distinct female castes using traditional approaches (tests of differential methylation) combined with a novel approach (analysis of co-expression and co-methylation networks). We found differences in expression and methylation profiles between workers and queens at different life stages, as well as some overlap between DNA methylation and expression at the functional level. Large portions of the transcriptome and methylome are organized into "modules" of genes, some significantly associated with phenotypic traits of castes and developmental stages. Several gene co-expression modules are preserved in co-methylation networks, consistent with possible regulation of caste-specific gene expression by DNA methylation. Surprisingly, brain co-expression modules were highly preserved when compared with a previous study that examined whole-body co-expression patterns in 16 ant species, suggesting that these modules are evolutionarily conserved and for specific functions in various tissues. Altogether, these results suggest that DNA methylation participates in regulation of caste specialization and age-related physiological changes in social insects.
Mots-clé
Genetics, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, ageing, caste, co-expression network, co-methylation network, phenotypic plasticity
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
03/06/2019 15:47
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:58
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