Predator-prey relationships and the evolution of genetic colour polymorphism: a comparative analysis in diurnal raptors

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_965E75607035
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Predator-prey relationships and the evolution of genetic colour polymorphism: a comparative analysis in diurnal raptors
Périodique
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
Auteur(s)
Roulin  A., Wink  M.
ISSN
0024-4066
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2004
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
81
Numéro
4
Pages
565-578
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Genetically based variation in coloration occurs in populations of many organisms belonging to various taxa, including birds, mammals, frogs, molluscs, insects and plants. Colour polymorphism has evolved in raptors more often than in any other group of birds, suggesting that predator-prey relationships was a driving evolutionary force. Individuals displaying a new invading colour morph may enjoy an initial foraging advantage because prey have difficulties in learning the colour of a rare morph (apostatic selection), or because morphs provide alternative foraging benefits allowing differently coloured individuals to exploit distinct food niches (disruptive selection). Plumage polymorphism should therefore have evolved in species that prey upon animals having the physiological ability to distinguish between differently coloured predators but also to flee once a predator has been detected. From this assumption, we can predict that closely related polymorphic and monomorphic species prey upon different animals. They may also differ in morphology, because foraging upon different prey may require different foraging modes, and in turn different morphological structures. We tested these two predictions in a comparative study of raptors. As expected, polymorphic and monomorphic species had a different diet, and there was a difference in wing length between polymorphic and monomorphic species within two genera (Buteo and Accipiter). Across all raptors for which phyl ogenetic relationships are known, polymorphic species preyed more often upon mammals than did monomorphic ones. These two types of raptor did not differ in the frequency of birds, insects and reptiles in their diets. We discuss these results in the light of the hypothesis that predator-prey relationships played a role in the evolution of colour polymorphism.
Mots-clé
alternative strategies, apostatic selection, colour morph, disruptive selection, genetic polymorphism
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 17:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:58
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