Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_95527C8FCF3A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents.
Périodique
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Uhre C.F., Uhre V.F., Lønfeldt N.N., Pretzmann L., Vangkilde S., Plessen K.J., Gluud C., Jakobsen J.C., Pagsberg A.K.
ISSN
1527-5418 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0890-8567
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
59
Numéro
1
Pages
64-77
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To assess benefits and harms of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) versus no intervention or versus other interventions for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
We searched for randomized clinical trials of CBT for pediatric OCD. Primary outcomes were OCD severity, serious adverse events, and level of functioning. Secondary outcomes were quality of life and adverse events. Remission from OCD was included as an exploratory outcome. We assessed risk of bias and evaluated the certainty of the evidence with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE).
Nine trials (N = 645) were included comparing CBT with no intervention and 3 trials (N = 146) comparing CBT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Compared with no intervention, CBT decreased OCD severity (mean difference [MD] = -8.51, 95% CI = -10.84 to -6.18, p < .00001, low certainty), improved level of functioning (patient-rated: standardized MD [SMD] = -0.90, 95% CI = -1.19 to -0.62, p < .00001, very low certainty; parent-rated: SMD = -0.68, 95% CI = -1.12 to -0.23, p = .003, very low certainty), had similar proportions of participants with adverse events (risk ratio = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.93-1.22, p = .39, GRADE: low certainty), and was associated with reduced risk of still having OCD (risk ratio = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.37-0.67, p < .00001, very low certainty). We had insufficient data to assess the effect of CBT versus no intervention on serious adverse events and quality of life. Compared with SSRIs, CBT led to similar decreases in OCD severity (MD = -0.75, 95% CI = -3.79 to 2.29, p = .63, GRADE: very low certainty), and was associated with similar risk of still having OCD (risk ratio = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.66-1.09, p = .20, very low certainty). We had insufficient data to assess the effect of CBT versus SSRIs on serious adverse events, level of functioning, quality of life, and adverse events.
CBT may be more effective than no intervention and comparable to SSRIs for pediatric OCD, but we are very uncertain about the effect estimates.
Mots-clé
adolescents, children, cognitive-behavioral therapy, obsessive-compulsive disorder, systematic review
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
13/10/2019 17:38
Dernière modification de la notice
13/06/2020 6:20
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