Recovery of biological motion perception and network plasticity after cerebellar tumor removal.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_9195778A5AD9
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Recovery of biological motion perception and network plasticity after cerebellar tumor removal.
Périodique
Cortex
Auteur(s)
Sokolov A.A., Erb M., Grodd W., Tatagiba M.S., Frackowiak R.S., Pavlova M.A.
ISSN
1973-8102 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0010-9452
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
59
Pages
146-152
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Visual perception of body motion is vital for everyday activities such as social interaction, motor learning or car driving. Tumors to the left lateral cerebellum impair visual perception of body motion. However, compensatory potential after cerebellar damage and underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. In the present study, visual sensitivity to point-light body motion was psychophysically assessed in patient SL with dysplastic gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease) to the left cerebellum before and after neurosurgery, and in a group of healthy matched controls. Brain activity during processing of body motion was assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Alterations in underlying cerebro-cerebellar circuitry were studied by psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis. Visual sensitivity to body motion in patient SL before neurosurgery was substantially lower than in controls, with significant improvement after neurosurgery. Functional MRI in patient SL revealed a similar pattern of cerebellar activation during biological motion processing as in healthy participants, but located more medially, in the left cerebellar lobules III and IX. As in normalcy, PPI analysis showed cerebellar communication with a region in the superior temporal sulcus, but located more anteriorly. The findings demonstrate a potential for recovery of visual body motion processing after cerebellar damage, likely mediated by topographic shifts within the corresponding cerebro-cerebellar circuitry induced by cerebellar reorganization. The outcome is of importance for further understanding of cerebellar plasticity and neural circuits underpinning visual social cognition.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
02/12/2014 18:46
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:54
Données d'usage