State of genomics and epigenomics research in the perspective of HIV cure.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_918C753591D4.P001.pdf (835.17 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_918C753591D4
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
State of genomics and epigenomics research in the perspective of HIV cure.
Périodique
Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS
Auteur(s)
Ciuffi A., Telenti A.
ISSN
1746-6318 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1746-630X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Volume
8
Numéro
3
Pages
176-181
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: One of the seven key scientific priorities identified in the road map on HIV cure research is to 'determine the host mechanisms that control HIV replication in the absence of therapy'. This review summarizes the recent work in genomics and in epigenetic control of viral replication that is relevant for this mission.
RECENT FINDINGS: New technologies allow the joint analysis of host and viral transcripts. They identify the patterns of antisense transcription of the viral genome and its role in gene regulation. High-throughput studies facilitate the assessment of integration at the genome scale. Integration site, orientation and host genomic context modulate the transcription and should also be assessed at the level of single cells. The various models of latency in primary cells can be followed using dynamic study designs to acquire transcriptome and proteome data of the process of entry, maintenance and reactivation of latency. Dynamic studies can be applied to the study of transcription factors and chromatin modifications in latency and upon reactivation.
SUMMARY: The convergence of primary cell models of latency, new high-throughput quantitative technologies applied to the study of time series and the identification of compounds that reactivate viral transcription bring unprecedented precision to the study of viral latency.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
16/05/2013 17:46
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:54
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