Single and paired-pulse electrical stimulation during invasive EEG recordings.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_8D30554A9E7C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Single and paired-pulse electrical stimulation during invasive EEG recordings.
Périodique
Revue neurologique
Auteur(s)
Boulogne S., Ryvlin P., Rheims S.
ISSN
0035-3787 (Print)
ISSN-L
0035-3787
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
172
Numéro
3
Pages
174-181
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Invasive EEG recordings are frequently required during the presurgical exploration of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy in order to clarify the epileptic zone location. Intracranial direct electrical stimulations (DES) induce EEG and/or clinical responses that participate in this evaluation. Clinical DES protocols (1Hz and/or 50Hz) trigger massive cortical activation that can elicit seizures, after-discharges or complex clinical signs. In contrast, low-energy (<1Hz) protocols activate more localized cortical regions using single-pulse electrical stimulations (SPES). SPES can elicit two main types of responses. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials (CCEPs) correspond to highly consistent early responses, appearing before 100ms after stimulation, with fixed latency; they are considered physiological and assess the effective connectivity between the recorded regions. Late responses appear after 100ms; they are rare, inconsistent with variable latency and are suggestive of an underlying epileptogenic cortex. Paired-pulse stimulation paradigm associates a conditioning and a test stimulation to induce intracortical inhibition or facilitation by modifying the response amplitude. Largely used in transcranial magnetic stimulation, it has rarely been applied to CCEP although the mechanisms put in place seem highly similar. Low frequency intracerebral stimulations allow analysing brain connectivity and cortical excitability with a high temporal and spatial resolution. The development of new stimulation protocols and the combination with imaging or statistical techniques recently offered promising results.

Mots-clé
Electric Stimulation/methods, Electroencephalography/instrumentation, Electroencephalography/methods, Epilepsy/diagnosis, Epilepsy/surgery, Humans, Neurosurgical Procedures
Pubmed
Création de la notice
01/04/2016 14:55
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:51
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