Olfactory receptor and circuit evolution promote host specialization

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_8BD867F10599
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Olfactory receptor and circuit evolution promote host specialization
Périodique
Nature
Auteur(s)
Auer T. O., Khallaf M. A., Silbering A. F., Zappia G., Ellis K., Álvarez-Ocaña R., Arguello J. R., Hansson B. S., Jefferis G. S. X. E., Caron S. J. C., Knaden M., Benton R.
ISSN
1476-4687
ISSN-L
0028-0836
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
579
Numéro
7799
Pages
402-408
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The evolution of animal behaviour is poorly understood <sup>1,2</sup> . Despite numerous correlations between interspecific divergence in behaviour and nervous system structure and function, demonstrations of the genetic basis of these behavioural differences remain rare <sup>3-5</sup> . Here we develop a neurogenetic model, Drosophila sechellia, a species that displays marked differences in behaviour compared to its close cousin Drosophila melanogaster <sup>6,7</sup> , which are linked to its extreme specialization on noni fruit (Morinda citrifolia) <sup>8-16</sup> . Using calcium imaging, we identify olfactory pathways in D. sechellia that detect volatiles emitted by the noni host. Our mutational analysis indicates roles for different olfactory receptors in long- and short-range attraction to noni, and our cross-species allele-transfer experiments demonstrate that the tuning of one of these receptors is important for species-specific host-seeking. We identify the molecular determinants of this functional change, and characterize their evolutionary origin and behavioural importance. We perform circuit tracing in the D. sechellia brain, and find that receptor adaptations are accompanied by increased sensory pooling onto interneurons as well as species-specific central projection patterns. This work reveals an accumulation of molecular, physiological and anatomical traits that are linked to behavioural divergence between species, and defines a model for investigating speciation and the evolution of the nervous system.
Mots-clé
Multidisciplinary
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
12/02/2019 23:04
Dernière modification de la notice
30/04/2021 7:12
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