Opposite turning behavior in right-handers and non-right-handers suggests a link between handedness and cerebral dopamine asymmetries

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_88E1B45BC912
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Opposite turning behavior in right-handers and non-right-handers suggests a link between handedness and cerebral dopamine asymmetries
Périodique
Behavioral Neuroscience
Auteur(s)
Mohr C., Landis T., Bracha H.S., Brugger P.
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2003
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
117
Numéro
6
Pages
1448-1452
Langue
anglais
Notes
0735-7044 (Print)
0735-7044 (Linking)
Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Résumé
The strong right hand preference in humans remains a riddle; no lateralized behavior other than fine finger dexterity relates to it. The relation between handedness and language dominance may be far weaker than currently judged; after all, both right-handers and non-right-handers utilize the left brain for speech. There is, however, a lateralized motor preference in animals, turning behavior, that is strongly associated with hemispheric dopamine (DA) asymmetries. Turning consistently occurs towards the side with less DA. The authors tested 69 right-handers and 24 non-right-handers with a device recording spontaneous turning behavior for 20 hr within 3 days. Findings indicate that right-handers preferred left-sided turning and non-right-handers preferred right-sided turning. This result suggests a link between handedness and DA asymmetries.
Mots-clé
Adult Analysis of Variance Dominance, Cerebral/*physiology Dopamine/*metabolism Female Functional Laterality/*physiology Humans Male Middle Aged Orientation/*physiology Reference Values Sex Factors Task Performance and Analysis
Création de la notice
17/01/2011 20:07
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:47
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