Oxygen saturation during daily activities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_888C3C941940
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Oxygen saturation during daily activities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Périodique
European Respiratory Journal
Auteur(s)
Soguel Schenkel  N., Burdet  L., de Muralt  B., Fitting  J. W.
ISSN
0903-1936 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/1996
Volume
9
Numéro
12
Pages
2584-9
Notes
Comparative Study
Journal Article --- Old month value: Dec
Résumé
Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently develop nocturnal oxygen desturation because of alveolar hypoventilation, worsening of ventilation-perfusion mismatch, and sometimes obstructive sleep apnoeas. In contrast, little is known about their oxygen status during the various activities of daily life. The aim of this study was to compare the oxygen saturation profile during day and night, and to assess the influence of different daily activities in COPD. During a rehabilitation programme, we studied 30 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD (median forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 37% of predicted), without marked hypoxaemia (median arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2) 9.1 kPa). Arterial oxygen saturation (Sa,O2) was assessed by pulse oximetry during night (8 h) and day (10.5 h). The mean and minimal Sa,O2 were calculated, and desaturations were defined as Sa,O2 falls > 4%.h-1. Daily activities were identified by the patients as resting, eating, washing, nebulization therapy and walking. Mean Sa,O2 was lower during the night (88%) than during the day (89%). In contrast, minimal Sa,O2 was lower during the day (69%) than during the night (72%), and the number of desaturations was higher during the day (8.6 desaturations.h-1) than during the night (6.8 desaturations.h-1). Mean Sa,O2 was 88% during walking, which was lower than during resting (90%), nebulization (90%), and meals (89%). The number of desaturations was higher during walking (13.1 desaturations.h-1), washing (12.6 desaturations.h-1), and eating (9.2 desaturations.h-1) than during resting (5.3 desaturations.h-1). We conclude that daily activities, such as walking, washing and eating, are associated with transient oxygen desaturation in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even without marked resting hypoxaemia.
Mots-clé
*Activities of Daily Living Aged Anoxemia/diagnosis/*etiology Female Humans Lung Diseases, Obstructive/blood/complications/*physiopathology Male Monitoring, Physiologic Oximetry Oxygen/*blood Sleep/physiology
Pubmed
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 10:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:47
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