Gender role attitudes and father practices as predictors of nonresident father-child contact

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_873DCB68D9F5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Gender role attitudes and father practices as predictors of nonresident father-child contact
Périodique
PLOS ONE
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Heers Marieke, Szalma Ivett
ISSN
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
21/04/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Editeur⸱rice scientifique
Pienta Amy Mehraban
Volume
17
Numéro
4
Pages
e0266801
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Due to an increasing number of parental union dissolutions, a growing number of fathers does not cohabit with their biological children. This article analyses individual and societal gender role attitudes as well as societal father practices as determinants of nonresident father-child contact. Previous research shows that individual-level factors influence the relationship between nonresident fathers and their children. Research on resident fathers indicates that individual attitudes and societal contexts affect father-child involvement. Little is known on the relationship between individual gender role attitudes as well as societal gender role attitudes and father practices and nonresident fathers’ involvement in their children’s lives. To shed more light thereon, we examine data from eleven Eastern and Western European countries from the first wave of the Gender and Generations Survey. We analyze two samples: One consisting of nonresident fathers of children aged 0 to 13 and one of fathers of adolescents aged 14 to 17. Logistic regression models assess if individual and societal gender role attitudes as well as societal father practices predict the probability of monthly father-child contact. Contact between nonresident fathers is affected by different factors depending on whether the focus is on children or adolescents. Societal gender role attitudes and societal father practices predict the probability of monthly contact between fathers and their children; individual gender role attitudes are less important. Individual gender role attitudes, on the other hand, predict the probability of monthly contact between nonresident fathers and their adolescent children; societal factors matter less for this age group.
Mots-clé
Multidisciplinary
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/04/2022 13:45
Dernière modification de la notice
26/04/2022 6:37
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