Brain structure in movement disorders: a neuroimaging perspective.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_813DD5C6E422
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Brain structure in movement disorders: a neuroimaging perspective.
Périodique
Current Opinion in Neurology
Auteur(s)
Draganski Bogdan, Bhatia Kailash P.
ISSN
1473-6551[electronic], 1080-8248[linking]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Volume
23
Numéro
4
Pages
413-419
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Purpose of review: An overview of recent advances in structural neuroimaging and their impact on movement disorders research is presented.
Recent findings: Novel developments in computational neuroanatomy and improvements in magnetic resonance image quality have brought further insight into the pathophysiology of movement disorders. Sophisticated automated techniques allow for sensitive and reliable in-vivo differentiation of phenotype/genotype related traits and their interaction even at presymptomatic stages of disease.
Summary: Voxel-based morphometry consistently demonstrates well defined patterns of brain structure changes in movement disorders. Advanced stages of idiopathic Parkinson's disease are characterized by grey matter volume decreases in basal ganglia. Depending on the presence of cognitive impairment, volume changes are reported in widespread cortical and limbic areas. Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes still pose a challenge for accurate morphometry-based classification, especially in early stages of disease progression. Essential tremor has been mainly associated with thalamic and cerebellar changes. Studies on preclinical Huntington's disease show progressive loss of tissue in the caudate and cortical thinning related to distinct motor and cognitive phenotypes. Basal ganglia volume in primary dystonia reveals an interaction between genotype and phenotype such that brain structure changes are modulated by the presence of symptoms under the influence of genetic factors. Tics in Tourette's syndrome correlate with brain structure changes in limbic, motor and associative fronto-striato-parietal circuits. Computational neuroanatomy provides useful tools for in-vivo assessment of brain structure in movement disorders, allowing for accurate classification in early clinical stages as well as for monitoring therapy effects and/or disease progression.
Mots-clé
Apparent Diffusion Coefficient, Corticobasal Degeneration, Dementia With Lewy Bodies, Diffusion-Weighted Imaging, Essential Tremor, Fractional Anisotropy, Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome, Huntington's Disease, Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease, Mean Diffusivity, Voxel-Based Morphometry, Multiple-System Atrophy, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Apparent Diffusion-Coefficient, White-Matter Hyperintensities, Primary Torsion Dystonia, Parkinsons-Disease, Huntingtons-Disease, Tourette-Syndrome, Essential Tremor
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
26/07/2010 11:17
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:41
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